Dear President Obama, since you asked…

November 10, 2010

In his recent remarks on the October Jobs Report, President Obama said…

“I am open to any idea, any proposal, any way we can get the economy growing faster…”

(If you can not see the video, you can find it here on YouTube.)

Thank you for asking Mr. President, here is my list:

First and foremost, focus on the sectors that are proven job creators.

Research from the Kauffman Foundation shows that newly created and young companies are the primary drivers of job creation in the United States. Added to this, data from the Edward Lowe Foundation and their research on Second Stage Companies that shows that establishments with 10 – 100 employees and $1 million to $100 million in revenue have created the vast majority of the net new jobs over time.  (Take a look at the data at www.youreconomy.org)

So if you are looking for job growth, focus on providing early stage and second stage companies what they need – and the American people will get what they need – more jobs.

These businesses need access to capital to grow and to create jobs.

The fuel that drives job growth in these growth sectors is capital.  When there is a steady supply of capital, there is a steady supply of new jobs.  It is capital that funds innovation, that purchases resources for manufacturing and supplies the catalyst for future growth.

Where does the money come from?

The capital that fuels growth in  early stage and second stage businesses comes from the following areas – the life savings of the business owner (including IRA’s and 401K’s with penalties), credit cards of the business owner (personal or business issue), F&F (Friends and Family), Angel Investors, Private Equity/Venture Capital, SBA Loans, Traditional Lending, Public Equity Markets and most important of all CUSTOMERS. 

In addition, the capital for growth often comes from operational cut backs and efficiencies inside the business, and more often than many would think, a business owner that is forgoing a paycheck while working 60 – 70 hours a week to keep things growing until the cash flow problem gets fixed.  

So if we need capital to grow these businesses and create jobs here are some suggestions:

Life Savings and 401K’s

Forgive penalties on withdrawals from IRA’s, 401K’s, and the like made by business owners for the business or to feed their families while they personally went without wages to keep the business alive AND allow them to put the money back in when things get better again.

Credit Cards

Extend the protections in the CONSUMER CREDIT PROTECTION ACT to include credit cards and charge cards that are issued to a business IF the card is personally guaranteed by the individual card holder.  These “business cards” are actively marketed to small business owners yet do not carry the same protections as those issued to “consumers”.

Friends, Family, and Angels

After the business owner, the most common form of early stage capital infusion comes from friends, family and Angel investors.  Interestingly these are the same people that will be adversely affected if the Bush Tax cuts are not renewed AND these are often the same people that are paying the lion’s share of taxes already.  It is critically important the that Bush Tax Cuts be made permanent.  The goal should not be to have a few people pay more – the goal needs to be stimulate job growth so that more people can pay something!

Private Equity and Venture Capital

Private Equity and Venture Capital have played major roles in the growth spurts of high growth and high potential companies.  These American businesses and private investors invest in American businesses and can be a supercharger on our growth engine.  Lynn Tilton, chairman  and founder of Patriarch Partners, traveled to Washington with a plan to help companies and spur job growth based on a proven model that she uses in her own companies.  This process is so unique that the US Patent Office issued a patent for it.  (Click to view Lynn Tilton’s patent.)

Administrator Karen Mills and her team at the SBA are making real progress with the expansion of the SBIC program but wouldn’t it be great to have more leaders and investors involved in this effort to create a lasting solution? Perhaps it time to take another look at her proposed SME Rescue Loan Plan or perhaps give her a call.

Tax breaks for small businesses

Mr. President, you often speak of your support of tax breaks for small business. Any tax break that allows businesses of any size to reinvest in the business and create more jobs is a good thing.  BUT, it is important to remember the tax breaks only benefit companies that are making profits to pay taxes on.  Many of the companies that will grow and create jobs now and in the future are investing ahead of the curve and are not yet profitable.  For these companies, a tax break is an empty promise. 

Instead perhaps a good idea would be tax breaks, tax credits, or other incentives for private equity and angel investors to motivate more of them to get out of the “parking lot” they are currently in and put their money to work in businesses that are creating jobs.  The American people have invested in Wall Street Bailouts, Cash for Clunkers, and credits for energy efficient appliances.  Perhaps its time we invested in American investors who are putting their hard earned money into American businesses.

Promoting innovation

Innovation is my personal passion.  My definition of innovation is simple.  Innovation is doing something in a new way that makes life better.  Just as we as business owners, investors and innovators need to focus on changes that make things better – we need you to do the same in Washington.  This includes:

  • Reversing the provision in the Healthcare Bill that will require all businesses to file a 1099 for EVERY supplier over $600.   At a time when you need us to run faster, you are tying our ankles together with red tape.  I know that Congress is the team that needs to fix this problem – but could you whisper in their ear?
  • Cut down on the red tape in general.  From an ever growing list of regulations on how we get things done to a multitude of forms in triplicate or worse when we do business with government agencies, it is getting harder to do business when we need it to get easier. 
  • Work with Congress to fully support the SBIR program on an ongoing basis instead of continually placing Band-Aid on it to keep it going.  According to the NSBA,  “small R&D companies employ 38 percent of all scientists and engineers in America. This is more than all U.S. universities and more than all large businesses. Furthermore, these small companies produce five times as many patents per dollar as large companies and 20 times as many as universities—and more small-business innovations are commercialized. Yet small companies receive only 4.3 percent of the federal government’s R&D dollars. The SBIR program provides more than half of this amount.”  Here’s a suggested innovation – set a permanent requirement to allocate government innovation contacts and  SBIR awards to small business based on the proportionate share of innovators they employ.  If we generate results like these at just over 4%, just imagine what would happen if we had almost 40^% to work with. 
  • Create a fast track program for new technologies and innovations moving from Phase I to Phase II contracts with government agencies.   With today’s backlog, some very promising companies and the technologies they have created could disappear due to delays that in some cases have been more than a year.
  • Drive innovation within the US Patent Office to take the costs out of what we need to do to protect American innovation.  Many small businesses can not afford the cost, time and expense as it is.  And for many of them, a patent is a of little value since most small businesses can not afford the cost to defend it.  (Small business patents are being violated on a regular basis and the response from big business is “sue me” when they well know that the small business could never afford to go the distance or carry the burden hundreds of thousands if not millions of dollars in legal fees.)

So Mr. President, you asked for suggestions.  These are mine.  I don’t know if you will ever see them, but I truly hope that someone on your team is listening.  We’re all in this together after all.

Sincerely,

Joan Koerber-Walker

 

About the author:

Joan Koerber-Walker, MBA is a small business owner and an angel investor who makes her home in Phoenix, Arizona.  As a blogger she has personally interviewed Lynn Tilton on several occasions and has personally worked with Patriarch Partners and its portfolio companies and seen the results of what the Patriarch process can do first hand.  In addition she is a past CEO of the Arizona Small Business Association and  a past member of the board of trustees for the National Small Business Association. During that time she met with and shared ideas with hundreds of small businesses and second stage companies on key issues including health care, workforce development, regulation, taxation, and access to capital.  She currently serves the small business community as a volunteer ambassador for SCORE in Phoenix, Arizona, as chairman of the Opportunity Through Entrepreneurship Foundation and as co-chair of the Arizona Entrepreneurship Conferences (AZEC10) which will gather together over 300 entrepreneurs, small business owners and investors together to share ideas, connect, and hit the “reset” button on their businesses on November 17, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona.

To contact Joan Koerber-Walker, click here.


Health Care Legislation on the Brink. Maybe it’s time for … Innovation and Change We Can Agree On

January 20, 2010

Watching the Massachusetts Senatorial election results yesterday, started me thinking back to the Presidential campaign of not so long ago… 

back in the days when BOTH candidates campaigned on themes of CHANGE. 

If we look back on President Obama’s first year in office, few would argue that it has been a Year of Change.  But most would agree, that in one way or another, it was also a year fraught with disagreements across many sectors.  The election of Scott Brown on January 19, 2010 to the Senate seat long held by Senator Ted Kennedy underscores that. 

A Beltway Scramble

Beltway Warriors on both sides of the aisle are now scrambling to develop new strategies on key issues, especially the highly publicized Health Care legislation that is so lengthy, so complicated, and so contentious that if you asked anyone – anywhere  if they agreed with ALL of it,  you would be hard pressed to to find anyone who could answer with a resounding YES!  It’s so full of Promise and Compromise that what started out to be a race horse now looks like a camel.  Some fear it may never even make it to the finish line when most would agree that change is needed.  Others fear it might.

It’s time for Innovation in Washington D.C. not Change.

Innovation to me has a simple definition.  INNOVATION IS DOING SOMETHING IN A NEW WAY TO MAKE LIFE BETTER FOR THE PEOPLE THAT MATTER. 

So here’s my suggestion for a true innovation.  Let’s shift from change we can believe in to Change we can AGREE ON and get it done NOW.

This listing from the Wall Street Journal takes a look at the House and Senate Healthcare Proposals side by side.  In it there are some things that most of us can agree on like

  • removing the ability for the insurance industry to place restrictions on pre-exiting conditions
  • restricting insurance companies from dropping coverage when people actually get sick
  • extending the time period that young adults can be covered under their parents insurance policies
  • making healthcare accessible and affordable for a broader section of the population through incentives or subsidies. 

A REAL change could be HOW we get it done.

Now is the time when the House and Senate are tasked with bringing the two proposals together in a final form.  This is an opportunity to do something in a NEW WAY.  Instead of more horse trading, side deals, and compromises, SIMPLIFY THE PROCESS. 

Pull out each of the key items/issues one piece at a time, prioritize them based on the degree of agreement, and put them to a vote as a stand alone issue. 

Talk about transparency.  No more thousand page documents with hidden deals.  It’s all there nice and clear.  You agree or disagree then vote to decide, send  it over to the appropriate agency to implement if it passes, and move on to the next item.

This would be change the American people could believe in and a change that we could  agree on.  Who knows – we might just make life better for the people – remember us. 

Thanks for stopping by.  Stay Tuned.

Joan Koerber-Walker

[Joan Koerber-Walker is a wife, a mother, a small business person, and a voter who lives in Phoenix, Arizona.  Her journey includes executive roles in corporate America, as an entrepreneur, as a community volunteer, and as a non-profit leader.]


Free – Isn’t

January 12, 2010

There is a lot of talk about all of the things that you can get for FREE these days.  Not surprising in an era where budgets are stretched and we are all looking to get more for less.

Last week, I had the pleasure of listening to Lon Safko, co-author of the Social Media Bible speak to a group of counselors from SCORE and the SBDC as a prelude to Greater Phoenix SCORE’s Social Media Event this January 14th and 15th.

During his presentation, Lon kept emphasizing the reasons, excellent ones BTW, that businesses need to pay attention to and utilize social media.  And repeatedly he punctuated his message with a continuing theme…Oh Yes!  It’s FREE!

But is it?

While access to these new social media platforms is free or in the case of some emerging premium products relatively inexpensive, let’s look at some of the costs.

FUNDING and Economic costs

Based on reports from Tech Crunch, the four most prominent platforms in their categories (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google) raised over $1 Billion in equity funding to get to where they are today.

  • Twitter is free – $160M in funding to date according to this time line from TechCrunch
  • Facebook is free – $716M in in funding to date according to this time line from TechCrunch.  With over 350 MILLION active users worldwide (if you are a demographer an interesting side note is that if Facebook users were a nation, they would now have exceeded the population of the United States of America making the Facebook Nation the 3rd largest country in the world!) 
  • LinkedIn is free (although new premium features carry a price)  – $103M in funding to date according to this time line from Tech Crunch. With more than 45 million users representing 150 industries around the world, LinkedIn is a fast-growing professional networking site that allows members to create business contacts, search for jobs, and find potential clients.
  • Google Search and many applications are free.  The search engine activity has been estimated at over 2 Billion searches each day with a related estimate of 300 Million unique users daily.  Google received $25.1M in funding according to this time line from TechCrunch

And that does not take into account that these are simply mediums across which information is shared.  The platforms have no value without content creation – think people sharing information -  and that takes time.  If we estimate that a combined 1 Billion visitors spent just 1 hour on the platforms entering/sharing their content each year at MINIMUM wage of $7.25/hour – content creation across the platforms would cost $7.25 Billion dollars – and that is for only 1 hour per year at minimum wage!  Now think about what your time is worth?  How many hours have you actually spent?

There is no such thing as a free lunch.

We’ve all heard it.  Heaven knows who said first.  “There is no such thing as a free lunch.”  I’ll attribute this one to my Grandma, she may not have been the first to say it – but she was the first to say it to me.   Everything has a cost, whether in time, money, or the opportunity cost (what you could have gotten if you used your time and money in a different way.)   Until you truly understand costs, you can never calculate value since cost is a key component of the value equation.

Value = Benefit – Cost

The concept of a wanting a free lunch is pervasive today across our entrepreneurial and business communities – not to mention our society as a whole.  Whether the benefit is accurate information provided by media outlets, advice from thought leaders, time with business advisors, or creative content like books, films and movies – there is a growing perception that in the new information age, knowledge and content is free.  But if we continue along this line of thinking, we may begin to find it is just the opposite.

No need to buy the cow if you already have the milk.

This was another favorite “Grandma Quote.”  For those of you who are smirking, no this post is not going down THAT avenue.  This maxim took on an entirely new meaning when I moved from a salaried position in corporate America to the role of an entrepreneur whose livelihood and business was based on providing valuable information for a fee.

In the early years of my business, I was actively networking and sharing ideas.  Soon my calendar was filled with invitations for FREE coffee, FREE Lunches, FREE dinners where a new business friend wanted to ‘pick my brain’ or ‘share’ an idea.  But more often than not, all that came out of the exchange was a few more inches around my waistline.  Over those meet ups, I would answer their questions, offer contacts, help create solutions.  And more often that not, my potential new business evaporated.  They had gotten what they needed from me over lunch while all I got was a hamburger and a diet coke!

Then Grandpa, an attorney, came to my rescue with some simple advice.  “The first exploratory hour is FREE, after that you go on the clock. Your time and knowledge IS your business.  If you do not value it, no one else will either.”

I’ve gotten better over the years.  (Although, I have to admit that I still give away “gallons of milk” because I often share a lot of ideas in that first hour and enjoy connecting with new people or volunteering within organizations that help entrepreneurs.) But now, when someone asks to come back to the table for second, third or fourth helpings, I am a bit wiser about knowing when to graciously decline those invitations to just get together and ‘chat’ over lunch.

For as Grandpa helped me understand… if you can’t find a way to run a profitable business, the business won’t be around to help others profit.

Google has figured this out and is making money.  Eventually, the other social media giants will too.  Old media will need to learn to monetize their ventures in new ways and the new cadre of consultants emerging from the rolls of corporate layoffs will learn the same lessons I have.  There is no free lunch – especially when you are the one serving up all the free information.

Well enough of all this for now. I need to get to work.  Understanding how to use Google Apps for a new project is the next item on my To Do List today.  To quote my friend Lon… “and did I mention that – it’s free?”  Well except that it will probably take all my ‘free’ time for the rest of the week to figure it all out.

Thanks for stopping by.  Stay Tuned…

Joan Koerber-Walker


Talk of the Town – 2010 will be MY Year

January 9, 2010

j0426527[1]Each year in January, I try to plan my calendar to meet with friends in the first two weeks.  I have a diverse group of friends ranging from entrepreneurs to folks from corporate America, from local community volunteers to national leaders, and from neighbors to old school chums.

By reaching out, reconnecting, asking questions, and listening, I get a really good cross section of what is happening and what is on people’s minds.  It also gives me a pretty good feel for what to expect in the year to come.

It probably comes as no surprise that, when I did this is January of 2009, there were lots of rumblings of rough weather ahead.  People where battening down the hatches and preparing to hold on to investments, jobs, and businesses by sheer will.  Folks that I talked to did not know what to expect – but one thing was pretty consistent… they we not expecting it to be good.

Yet, this year, there is a different feeling in the conversations.  I don’t know  what it is  – the stars in alignment, something in the water, or just the impact of moving into a new decade, but once again a message is emerging from all of these conversations – a common statement and theme that  I am hearing from others…

2010 will be MY year!

The first time I heard it expressed by a friend with such confidence that I felt it too, I thought – ‘Wow, good for you.’  Then I heard it again – this time by a business owner – “This will be OUR year”.  And then again from an entrepreneur, then a scientist, then a developer, then a non profit leader, and so on.  The words were slightly different each time, but the theme kept repeating over and over again.  2010 was going to be the year when they made a break through, grew their business, did something new, made a difference.

So, will 2010 be YOUR year? 

We all have the chance to make 2010 our year.  Here are a few things you might want to put to work for you.

1.  Write down your goals and put them somewhere where you see them every day.  A series of small goals that build on one another are better that one great big one.  That way, as you achieve each small goal or milestone, the sense of accomplishment gives you more incentive and energy to tackle the next one.

2.  Gather Great People Around You.  Whether you call them a team, a posse, a workgroup or just friends, surround yourself  with people who share your values AND your goals. By working together – things happen faster.  The shared experiences of your team can also help you avoid pitfalls and mistakes that might shift you off course.

3.  Focus in on the things that will make the biggest impact.  It is too easy to be distracted by little things that can keep you from doing the important ones.  Take the time to understand how you are most productive and then work with others to delegate or off load non core activities.  Paying someone else to do the time consuming nuisance projects can save BIG money in the long run or free you up for more impactful or productive activities.

4. Use Processes and Systems to Your Advantage.  The best businesses, projects, and ideas are those you can replicate over and over again.  Figure out what works best, get it down on paper and integrate it into HOW you get things done.  By creating repeatable systems or processes, you save time, save money and often by analyzing the system – continue to improve it.

Never forget that “2010 will be MY year”. 

Stay positive and positive things happen.  Don’t let anyone tell you differently. 

Make 2010 your year.

Thanks for stopping by.  Stay Tuned.

Joan Koerber-Walker


Valuing a Company

October 18, 2009

From time to time, I get involved in answering a tricky question.  “What is this company worth?”  Sometimes the question comes up when speaking to a business owner or executive who is truly trying to increase the value of their organization.  At other times the question is raised from someone looking for investors or buyers.  And then most importantly – I ask it myself when the buyer or investor might be me.

Years ago, in business school, I had great professors at the W.P. Carey School of Business.  They taught me the science of financial valuation and how to look at the opportunities  and systematic business risks that lie buried behind the balance sheet.  There where times in the learning process when I might have cursed my teachers for being so exacting, but the lessons they taught combined with the insights I gained from my fellow students were worth more than a pot of gold.

Measuring a company’s value falls into 3 categories

What it has – it’s assets

Assets can be real and tangible.  We all know about these: property, plants, and equipment plus firm contracts and money in the bank.  We can see it, touch it, count it up.  Other assets are intangible.  We know that there is some level of value, but measurement is often subtle, involving an estimation of the worth.  This can be a patent, a trademark, or a customer or prospect list that in and of it self has no hard value, but when put to good use can be converted to tangible assets in the future, 

What it lacks or  owes – It’s liabilities

On the other side of the equation are the liabilities.  Some are easy to measure and take the form of debt, contractual obligations, or other factors that reduce the company’s assets.  But there are other more intangible liabilities to factor in like adverse economic conditions, holes in the team, or a lack in organizational bandwidth – you know – too much to do and not enough resources to do it with.

What It promises – Its brand as an organization

And most important of all, I look at what the company promises to its people, its customers, its partners and its investors through its brand as an organization, PLUS  its ABILITY to keep those promises.

We all make promises, and most up us do everything in our power to keep them.  The question I focus on most closely is can the company turn promise into reality with its unique combination of assets and liabilities. 

  • Does it have a clear and simple plan that the team can follow to keep the promises it makes? Are there clearly defined goals, strategies, tactics? Are there clear measurement milestones along the way?
  • Does it have a culture that supports its team in achieving shared objectives.  It’s sad but true.  Objectives and goals that are not shared by the team are rarely achieved.
  • Does it have the resources to give to that team so that they can execute on the plan? And if not – does it have the ability to get them?
  • Does it use its assets wisely?  Is it investing in its people and its product to take and hold a leadership position in its markets  in the future?
  • Does it look at its customers, supply chain, and investors as collaborative partners and treat them accordingly?
  • Is leadership committed to keeping the promises it makes to the team, the partners, the customers, and the investors.
  • Does every member of the team share that commitment?

The Value of the COMPANY

When I am done with the measuring, I add it all up.  What I then have is a valuation of the company in a form that they rarely teach in business school.  A clearer picture of whether the company can keep its organizational promise and create value as well as what it may to make that happen, and what I can do to help along the way.

Because, at the end of the day, the true value of any company is in the promises it makes, and its ability to keep them.

Thanks for stopping by.  Stay Tuned…

Joan Koerber-Walker


What would you do if your friends all disappeared?

September 29, 2009

Poof!  Where did everybody go?Have you ever had a dream where you were surrounded by people and then in an instant you were all alone? As if a wizard waved a magic wand and all of your friends disappeared? 

Hopefully in the waking world, there are no powerful wizards to wave a magic wand and make your true friends evaporate, but in today’s wonderful world of technology, it can seem like everything is fine and then… Poof – your Twitter account is gone, or you have lost your email and phone contact list, or worse you have lost EVERYTHING on your computer! 

Suddenly you are looking around saying “Hey – Where did everybody go?!”

It would be great if this too only happened in fairy tales; but, I have heard too many real life stories from friends who have it happen to them.

Perhaps the information was on a work computer and they lost their job.  Or, their Twitter account got taken away for a reason only Twitter knows – and good luck getting someone to tell you why any time soon.  And even if they do the damage is already done.  Oh no,  those little green meanies attacked – a computer virus infects your computer and your phone all at the same time and a lifetime worth of contacts disappear in a puff of smoke.  Now this is the stuff that any business person’s nightmares are made of.

It can happen to anybody and happen it does – frequently.  Every one of these scenarios happened to friends of mine in the last few weeks.  So it helps to add a little redundancy to your life.  Here are a few tips…

For Twitter

1.  If you are on Twitter and your Twitter ID is linked to your job, start a personal Twitter account that is not work related and ask you real friends on Twitter to follow you there too.  That way, if you change jobs, you have not lost all your friends across the twitterverse,  You know, the ones you spent all that time developing relationships with.

2.  Use a free service like TweetTake to down load a CSV file in Excel once each month.  I do this regularly after my monthly clean up process.  Another free service, Tweet Back will soon have this process automated so you can do  it every day.  That way if you do have a problem you have list to try and restore your friends list from.

For your personal and business contacts

1.  Connect with friends on multiple platforms like Facebook, Plaxo and LinkedIn.  That way if your personal computer systems fail or your job goes away, you have not lost all your key contacts. An added plus to these systems is that as your friends move around – you get the updated information too.

2.  GMAIL is a great free back up plan, even if you do not use it as your main email address or client.  Simply export your address book from MS Outlook or other program to a CSV file and upload it to GMAIL.  Now you have a free back up on the Google network of servers.

Like it or not – your life is linked to your computer

1.  Have multiple computer back ups!  Back up your computer regularly and have more than one back up file so that if one gets corrupted the other one works.  (This is also critically important if you also keep key personal or financial information on your home or laptop computer not to mention all your pictures and other priceless digital keepsakes.)

2.  Remote Back Ups are like Fire and Casualty Insurance – just common sense.  For your home or for your office and especially if your home IS your office, having everything in one location can be a problem.  Fires, floods and break ins can and do happen.  A remote back up system can be a life saver.  There are a number of systems out there, one that is very reasonably priced (<$5/month) is Mozy by Decho, for larger systems, like an office, I have had also had great results with Data Preserve.  There are lots of services out there, but which ever one you ultimately choose, having a remote backup is not something to WISH you had the day AFTER you have a problem.

Yes, your digital life can change like that – Poof!  It never hurts to be prepared with a little magic of your own.

Thanks for stopping by.  Stay Tuned…

Joan Koerber-Walker


Small Business…BIG Impact

September 25, 2009

When you are talking about economic impact, small business is a BIG deal.  For two years I had the opportunity to serve as the CEO of the Arizona Small Business Association and and on the Board of Trustees of the National Small Business Association.  During that time.  I sat and talked with many small business owners, toured their offices and factories, listened to their stories,  and then traveled to the Arizona Capitol and to Washington D.C. to share those stories with Senators and Representatives. 

Retreats at the Edward Lowe Foundation in Cassopolis, Michigan and visits to the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation in Kansas City where times to exchange ideas with economic developers from around the country on how to make a difference in our local communities as well as at the national level.

What I learned, I shared in the pages of BizAZ Magazine, on our blog, and with ANY audience that would listen.  To paraphrase Bob Dylan, the times, they were a changing.  Here are some clips from one of those talks from October of 2007…

Joan Koerber-Walker on Small Busness and Economic Recovery

Let’s look at the facts from the most recent

SBA Office of Advocacy Report

In the United States, small firms with less that 500 employees:

  • Represent 99.7 percent of all employer firms.
  • Employ just over half of all private sector employees.
  • Pay 44 percent of total U.S. private payroll.
  • Have generated 64 percent of net new jobs over the past 15 years. 
  • Create more than half of the nonfarm private gross domestic
    product (GDP). 
  • Hire 40 percent of high tech workers (such as scientists, engineers, and computer programmers). 
  • Are 52 percent home-based and 2 percent franchises. 
  • Made up 97.3 percent of all identified exporters and produced  30.2 percent of the known export value in FY 2007.
  • Produce 13 times more patents per employee than large patenting firms; these patents are twice as likely as large firm patents to be among the one percent most cited.

Source: SBA office of Advocacy,  U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census and International Trade Admin.; Advocacy-funded research by Kathryn Kobe, 2007  and CHI Research, 2003 ; U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Where will recovery REALLY come from?

Today, economists and business experts are saying that “the recession is over and we are beginning our gradual climb out.”  Assuming that Wall Street and the financial markets don’t implode again, they are probably right.  But if we want to speed up the recovery process, we need  to shift our thinking and economic support more to what can we do DIRECTLY to give small businesses the resources that they need to grow.  That is where the real net job growth will come from.  Until  we get our unemployment problem solved, we don’t get our consumer confidence problem resolved.  If no one is buying – there is no recovery.   It’s that simple.

We need jobs to get the economy growing again and that means we need to supply the resources SMALL Businesses need to create jobs.  Current programs to provide training and loans for ‘bankable’ businesses are being provided at a variety of levels.  But the sad truth is that many high growth potential small businesses are not not bankable by today’s standards.  The economic conditions of the last year have hit their balance sheets too hard. 

The graph below shows where job growth actually came from in the period from 2005 to 2007.  Stage One firms are those with less than 10 employees.  Stage Two is 10- 99 employees, Stage Three is 100 – 499, and Stage Four is BIG Business 500+ employees.  What you are looking at is a national snapshot, but you can look at your state, country or MSA also at YourEconomy.org.

image

It’s time for something new

If we want to jump start the economy and get on the road to real recovery, maybe its time for a new type of economic stimulus.  Instead of investing in programs to train small business on how to grow – lets create new programs to allow them the access to capital they need to actually do it.  The old ways are not working very well – and in the words of the last election – IT’S TIME FOR CHANGE. 

Thanks for stopping by.  Stay tuned…

Joan Koerber-Walker


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